How to Ensure Your SMS Carrier Isn’t the Weakest Link in Your Security Chain

For businesses and users alike, there has recently been a big security shift to two-factor authentication, and many companies are leaning on mobile devices to provide authentication codes in a timely manner for users.

The way it works is pretty simply. Once customers login using their usernames and passwords, they have to then authenticate their entry a second time by entering a code sent to their mobile device.

Companies all around the globe also rely on SMS for redundancy in communication when internet isn’t available, to ensure their communications are never disrupted.

With a lot of services relying on this method of authentication and redundancy, there has never been more pressure on you mobile accounts to stay secure. It’s important to make sure your SMS carrier isn’t the weakest link in your security chain by choosing a secure SMS gateway solution.

Why rely on SMS in the first place? Your information is valuable.

The number one method of communication is email—personal and business users alike across the web use it to communicate, as well as to authenticate accounts and send sensitive information.
This infographic from Krebson Security shows just how valuable your email account can be when hacked—pretty much all of your accounts are connected to your email, and it can be a little scary to realize what someone could access there:

Krebson also goes into detail about how valuable these account can be to a hacker:

“One prominent credential seller in the underground peddles iTunes accounts for $8, and Fedex.com, Continental.com and United.com accounts for USD $6. Groupon.com accounts fetch $5, while $4 buys hacked credentials at registrar and hosting provider Godaddy.com, as well as wireless providers Att.com, Sprint.com, Verizonwireless.com, and Tmobile.com. Active accounts at Facebook and Twitter retail for just $2.50 a piece.”

In addition to the monetary value, hackers are also disrupting businesses with security breaches, account turnovers and major customer data thefts. If your internet security fails, you’re vulnerable to communication failure as well as to a security breach.

SMS provides a secure and reliable alternative to email, while also complementing the easy use of email. Without SMS, you’re flying solo with email—every service you use probably requires an email address, and all security precautions can become undone if someone unwanted gets access.

Keep the second link in your chain secure—work with the right SMS software and hardware.

Hackers can get a hold of your passwords easily through your mobile provider without the right security precautions.

Reliance on a secure SMS gateway ensures your communications stay up and running through SMS, even when internet is down. The right SMS gateway will keep your information secure through the two-factor authentication process and support your business in the event of an internet disruption.

Naturally, both users and businesses want their methods of communication to be calm and dependable.
SMSEagle hardware SMS gateways send SMS messages directly to 3G network without using Internet connection. The gateway will work even if Internet connection fails. The SMSEagle gateway, once purchased, is located in your company premises. These assures you control over security and confidentiality of SMS communication. No matter the temperature or humidity conditions the hardware sticks with you.

If you care about quality and security, you need a reliable SMS gateway solution to ensure that your mobile carrier isn’t the weakest link in your security chain.

 

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Megan has been writing about enterprise technology, data, infosecurity and environmental technology for several years. Tweet her @MeganRoseM, or check out her blog: www.meganmorreale.com.

Network Monitoring — How SMS can Reduce Risk and Improve Response Time

As a network administrator, your role is a complex one but your primary task is to keep the network active and ensure that all users have smooth access to all network assets. You may have to conduct performance tests, hardware and software inventory audits (including virtual machines) and monitor areas from UPS battery status to current website connections. Configuration and maintenance take up more of your time. A variety of monitoring tasks are necessary and you perform all of them using a combination of enterprise solutions, third-party software and open source tools.

Where does SMS fit into this high-tech environment? In technology terms, SMS has been around a long time (since 1992) and many falsely believe that it is no longer of value today. This is not the case as the technology is still used in many practical applications, in emergency alert systems, in marketing and, of course, it also has valuable applications in network monitoring.

Network Downtime

Sometimes technology fails, an unfortunate fact of life, but true nonetheless. When your network goes down, your business will grind to a halt in most cases. A power outage, for example, will typically mean that all network communication will cease from that moment on. Uninterruptible power supplies (UPS’) may delay the inevitable for a few hours and generators will ensure local access continues. However, if the power loss is not confined to your building but instead a blackout affecting your neighbourhood, city or county, then you can assume your broadband connection has been lost.

If this occurs during office hours, when IT staff are onsite, then normal service will resume as soon as the power returns. However, what happens if the outage occurs outside office hours and you have an e-commerce store that relies on your servers and a high-speed broadband connection? You may have scheduled backups or support sites that have been interrupted. In such a setting, it is important that service is resumed quickly.

In most cases, you will be unaware of the outage until the start of the next working day. Can your company afford such a delay? Consider the financial and reputational impact of this downtime.

Citing a 2015 IHS report, Network Computing’s Joe Strangelli estimated “ a cost to North American companies of $700 billion a year for ICT outages. This includes lost employee productivity (78%), lost revenue (17%), and actual costs to fix the downtime issues (5%).”

Of the 400 mid to large U.S. companies surveyed, an average of five downtime incidents take place each year, with costs for each incident ranging from $1 million to $60 million.

Luckily, it is possible to eliminate some of the risk.

SMS Benefits

If your network goes down, response time is the most important factor as solving the problem quickly reduces downtime costs.  Sending an alert to your IT admin may seem an obvious solution but how is this achieved?

An SMS gateway is a way to build in some form of redundancy to your network alerts. If your network is down, a standard email or network alert will not work as… the network is not operational due to loss of power or loss of connection. An SMS gateway has its own power source, a SIM card to allow cellular network access and preconfigured alert messages. Once the gateway detects connectivity loss, it sends an SMS to the network administrator. It can also send emails if a 2G+ data connection is available. 2G is slow but functional. SMS is effective for several reasons – it works on all mobile networks (from GSM to 4G) and on all mobile phones.

In addition, the recipient is more likely to respond quickly to an SMS alert than any other form of electronic communication. Given the number of tweets, beeps, pings and other audio notifications on smartphones, it is surprising that SMS still retains top status in terms of response rates, but marketers confirm that SMS creates a genuine sense of urgency for each received message.

Therefore, your network administrator is sure to act quickly after receiving an SMS alert, and with any luck, can get your network operational as soon as possible.

Other considerations

Companies with SMS gateways in place can relax, secure in the knowledge that essential connections are monitored and that once inactive, an alert is sent out to the responsible parties.

However, alerts alone are not enough to ensure network uptime. As mentioned previously, technology will fail and a comprehensive inventory of spare parts is necessary to mimimise network downtime. Human error and cybersecurity threats are other issues that alerts will not solve–but IT and security awareness training for all employees will not only mitigate these threats but also reduce the risk of network downtime.

In conclusion, when network downtime occurs, you need a rapid response team. Given the cost of downtime to your company, it is worth ensuring your network administrator receives immediate alerts when the network fails. This not only makes financial sense but is a no-brainer for maximising business continuity and preventing reputational damage.

 

Michael O’Dwyer is a Hong Kong-based business and technology journalist, independent consultant and writer whose stories have appeared on Forbes.com, The Street, IBM’s Midsize Insider, HP’S Pulse of IT, Dell’s Tech Page One and other IT portals, typically covering areas where business and technology intersect. He writes for both US and UK audiences and acts as a technology and open source advocate in his personal and professional activities. Twitter: @MJODWYERHK

How to Choose the Perfect SMS Gateway for Your Organization

The SMS Gateway that you select for your organization is important—it’s the portal that connects your team with other contacts mobily.

Your connection to mobile carriers like Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, Virgin, Bell and more is important and will make or break your success in the event of a connection loss.

Without the time, resources or desire to develop your own gateway, many information technology (IT) leaders are in the market for SMS mobile solutions. The right SMS gateway provider will help you move forward.

Connecting with the right provider can be tough. These three tips will help you choose the perfect SMS Gateway provider for your organization.

Choose a Provider with Good Coverage and Network Quality

The first step in choosing an SMS gateway provider will be to ensure that they’re providing you with the coverage you need. Some providers don’t have the ability to deliver to certain countries or mobile operators, and you’ll want to make sure you choose one that extends to your needs.

Some providers might not be able to guarantee of delivery—an SMS message could be routed to other gateways that are not controlled directly by the gateway providers themselves. In addition, some might not be able to reach mobile phone numbers that have been ported between operators.

If you have the opportunity, you’ll want to test a gateway provider’s network quality before you decide to choose them. Some may offer you a small amount of free messages for new users. If so, take advantage to ensure quality is adequate for your needs.

Choose a Service that Works when the Internet is Down

For some business, their SMS gateway is an essential part of communication and IT functionality. You want to be sure that you’re getting your SMS message, even if there are internet connectivity problems.

This happens when your SMS provider frees you of having to work with 3rd party vendors, and connects you directly to carriers. With SMSEagle, you are connected directly to the GSM network and can be controlled optionally by SNMP—meaning you’ll never have to worry about an SMS message coming through, no matter what internet connectivity problems you may be having.

Choose a Business Oriented Partner

While you’ll easily find a gateway service provider that will allow you to securely send SMS, some are better suited for managing your SMS communications.

Look for a SMS gateway provider that will work with you and your needs, providing the business functionality and support you’ll need to ensure your IT operations run smoothly.

Finally, when looking for a channel through which to send SMS communications, make sure you find a provider that provides you with the functionality you need without nickel and diming you. In some cases, many providers charge extra for the “bells and whistles” that should come with basic functionality. Choose a reliable provider with technology you know you can count on.

Consider SMSEagle as an SMS Gateway for your Organization

We are a powerful device for sending SMS messages for your organization—a reliable, cost-effective and secure solution that controls SMS alerts, notification and tokens for controlling your servers and services.

We guarantee the success of your SMS message regardless of internet connectivity, and send SMS directly to GSM network with SMSEagle SMS Hardware Gateway. We even monitor your network and send you alerts when your services are down.

With SMSEagle you get the whole package – a provider that knows and is compliant with the regulations and legislation pertinent to you, SMPP protocol, works when the internet is down, and is a business oriented provider.

For your SMS communications, who are you going to trust? Trust the provider that gives you everything you need, and provides you with secure, reliable SMS messaging at all times.

SMSEagle is Hardware SMS gateway to send and receive SMS text messages. To find out how we can help support your network security program, check out our online store.

 

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Megan has been writing about enterprise technology, data, infosecurity and environmental technology for several years. Tweet her @MeganRoseM, or check out her blog: www.meganmorreale.com

6 reasons why texting works better than app push notifications

There are plenty of people, perhaps even you, who believe that an app is the answer to every company’s communication challenges.

It’s true that apps are generally easy to find and install. Since more people are using mobile devices, some as a prime source of communication instead of a desktop or a laptop, an app isn’t a bad way to access information without visiting your device’s browser.

Plus, ‘push’ notifications from some apps make it easy to provide you the exact info you need rather than having to search it out.

However, there’s also another digital tool that’s even easier to work with: the text message.

Some have said that SMS has served its purpose and is past its prime, but texting continues to be a popular way of interacting. Here’s why:

  • You can respond. Push notifications are one-way messages sent to everyone who has signed up through an app. If you want to respond or have further questions, you must find contact info through your app or a company site, and then send an email, a voice mail or even a text. With texts you can always respond and even have a conversation.
  • Access to larger audiences. Not everyone who is a fan of a particular company or product will download its official app, or even has the right type of phone to do so. But just about everyone has text capabilities on their mobile devices. Businesses wanting to connect with more subscribers and potential customers can easily send texts rather than cultivating the smaller number of app subscribers.
  • Easy to create multiple lists and manage multiple campaigns. Companies that send out mass texts can use texting programs to segment different audiences, often by different topics, demographic info or interests. But with push notifications, every subscriber gets the same message, although every end-user can configure how they’re displayed.
  • Texting is inexpensive. Texting is one of the more affordable ways to contact customers. You may have to pay extra if you create MMS (multimedia messages with audio, video or photo attachments) or buy short codes, which are words and numbers customers can use to respond to you. In comparison, an app can be a significant financial investment for your company. Whether you’re building one from the ground up or a using a third-party, the process takes weeks or even months of design and testing time.
  • Easy sign-up. To subscribe to a business text list requires only one opt-in, where you inform the company that you want to start receiving their messages. Push notifications, on the other hand, require installing the app, customizing it to sign up for apps, and sometimes adding other security steps such as an authentication passcode.
  • Universal compatibility. Texting works worldwide, or at least anywhere you can access a mobile network. Apps may have certain restrictions or areas where notifications may not work.

Overall, app notifications make it easy to connect to mobile users. But in terms of person-to-person communication, texting still remains champion.

 

Joe Butler writes about personal finances and the modern retail experience. He loves the idea of mobile coupons, since he frequently forgets the paper ones at home.
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5 Security Experts on Why IT Leaders Need to Start Automating

Automation has been cited as the next big thing for IT leaders looking to secure their communications in all types of cloud environments—but leadership knows the challenges they face in doing so.

Answering to a Network World survey, 47% of respondents claim that it is difficult to monitor network behavior from end-to-end, and 41% say these security operations have difficulties that arise from cloud computing.

The main problem with not automating security operations is scalability and the difficulty in setting up these systems. But it’s necessary—it’s impossible to keep up with the increasing pace, limited cybersecurity, and network operations personnel, all while managing network security operations on a box-by-box, or CLI-by-CLI basis.

But don’t take our word for it. These five security experts have driven deep into the world of network security, and have their own reasons for passing along advice to IT leaders to start automating security processes today.

Security Experts and their Reasons for Encouraging IT Leaders to Automate

According to the Enterprise Security Group (ESG) 63% of networking and cybersecurity professionals working at enterprise organizations (more than 1,000 employees) believe network security operations is more difficult today than it was two years ago.

The bottom line – the main roadblock standing in the way of IT leaders and automated security process is difficulty. Here’s why you should take the plunge despite the challenges.

Jon Oltsik, ESG Senior Principal Analyst and Founder of the Firm’s Cybersecurity Service

Oltsik knows the scalability problems that security leadership faces, even though leadership knows the risk they’re taking without it. He cites a survey of 150 IT professionals, where 31% of respondents say automation is “critical” to address future IT initiatives, while 58% claim it is “very important” to address future IT initiatives.

Because of the recognition of its importance, the technology industry is listening – Companies like Cisco, Fortinet, Check Point, and more have all introduced solutions that will assist security network operations teams in automation and visibility of their networks. His advice to leadership is to adopt these technologies:

“Since relying on people and manual processes can’t scale or keep organizations secure, CISOs and network operations managers should assess where they are in the network security operations automation transition as soon as possible, making sure to look into their people, processes and technologies.

Once shortcomings and bottlenecks are discovered, large organizations should develop a plan to address these areas and institute network security operations automation projects, phasing in capabilities over the next few years.” Jon Oltsik

Stephanie Tayengco, SVP of Operations, Logicworks

Tayengco is a proponent for automation, but automation the right way in the face of risk. Her bottom line—you need to get rid of as much manual work as possible to stay secure.

According her, it’s important to automate infrastructure buildout first, continually check instances across the environment, fully automate deployments, include automated security monitoring in those deployments, and finally, prepare for the future of automation.

“Ninety-five percent of all security incidents involve human error, according to IBM’s 2014 Cyber Security Intelligence Index.

This year alone, enterprises will spend $8 billion on cyber security, but these initiatives are often useless in preventing an engineer from misconfiguring a firewall or forgetting to patch a security vulnerability on a new server. Manual work is risk, and manual security work is a disaster waiting to happen.” – Stephanie Tayengco

Gabby Nizri, CEO, Ayehu

Nizri is worried about the rising number of security breaches. According to the ISACA 2015 Global Cybersecurity Status Report, 781 publicized cyber security breaches resulted in 169 million personal records being exposed.

Well-known companies like BlueCross, Harvard and Target were involved, making it clear that even the most sophisticated and well-funded security departments aren’t safe. Even so, only 38% of organizations across the globe can confidently say they are prepared to handle a sophisticated cyber-attack. Because of this, Nizri urges you to automate.

“Simply put, IT personnel are no match for such intensive, sustained attacks. Not only are humans incapable of keeping up with the sheer volume of incoming threats, but their ability to make quick and highly-impactful decisions to manually address such an attack is equally inefficient.

This is why automation is becoming such a powerful and effective component of cyber security incident response. To combat the onslaught of incoming threats, organizations must employ an army of equivalent strength and sophistication.” – Gabby Nizri

Danelle Au, VP of Strategy and Marketing at SafeBreach

Automation isn’t all about just avoiding mistakes. Au cites instances where automation makes an IT department more agile, and improves processes such as application delivery.

For the private cloud environment, applications and desktops are being virtualized at an faster than ever before. According to Au, As the number of virtual machines (VMs) increases, automation and orchestration is no longer a “nice to have.”

“The ability to translate complex business and organization goals into a set of automated data center workflows is critical to not slowing down the application delivery process. It is also an essential part of making compliance and security requirements a lot easier to manage in a very dynamic environment.

To fully realize the promise of private clouds or software defined data centers (as VMware defines it), the traditional IT infrastructure — in particular network security — needs to transform into agile and adaptive end-to-end automated processes.” – Danielle Au

Brian Dye, VP of Intel Security Group

A recent ESG study noted that 46% of organizations said they have a “problematic shortage” of cybersecurity skills—up from 28% just a year ago. That means the development of these skills in IT personnel isn’t improving at a rate needed to keep up with threats.

One-third of those respondents said their biggest gap was with cloud security specialists. According to Dye, this is the reason security automation is important, as well for working with SDN technologies and responding to breaches.

“As organizations explore software defined networking (SDN), they see a need for more automation skills, as security policy must co-exist with the orchestration to fully exploit an SDN environment. These skills become especially important as virtualization expands beyond servers and into networks and storage.” – Brian Dye

Network security automation is important for many reasons – the risks associated with manual processes, adaptation to new technologies, the agility of the cloud, and the race to keep up the skills needed in personnel to use new emerging technologies.

Creating the proper mix of skillsets, automation and processes will provide IT leaders with the security confidence they need moving forward.

SMSEagle is Hardware SMS gateway to send and receive SMS text messages. To find out how we can help support your network security program, check out our online store.

 

meganmorreale-headshot

Megan has been writing about enterprise technology, data, infosecurity and environmental technology for several years. Tweet her @MeganRoseM, or check out her blog: www.meganmorreale.com

Redundancy and Automated Alerts Ensure Business Continuity?

In the UK and Ireland, you are made redundant when you lose your job. When something is redundant, it means that it is unnecessary, a duplicate of the existing. However, in networking and indeed business terms, having redundant options is a positive concept, as it refers to backup solutions that take over when the primary fails.

In a perfect world, where hardware often has a predetermined or estimated lifespan, companies will ensure that business continuity is possible for a wide range of ‘disasters’ whether these include loss of services, hardware failure, data loss or other unexpected events such as fire, flooding and severe weather conditions. These secondary solutions are known as redundant, backup or ‘failover’ solutions as their function is to assume control or allow the means to restore services when the primary goes down.

How important is redundancy for the average company? Is it feasible to guarantee 100 per cent uptime? What steps can companies take to minimise risk or downtime?

Obviously, due to budgetary constraints common to many companies, it is not possible to simply clone an entire IT infrastructure to ensure uptime in all areas. In any case, even if budgets are available, it does not make business or financial sense to do so. However, companies can take steps to protect themselves and reduce downtime risk.

Essential Services

In terms of business continuity, all companies are at the mercy of power companies and loss of power is a problem that faces everyone. It is solved by the use of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) for every network device. Unfortunately, they are expensive and are not a long-term solution if power loss lasts more than a few hours. Generators will solve the problem and allow internal tasks to resume.

Given the likelihood that any blackout is not limited to your premises, you have also lost internet access, apart from internet-enabled mobile devices, of course.

It is for this reason that many companies utilise cloud services, with managed service providers for key customer-facing elements of the business, such as e-commerce websites, for example. The adoption of a hybrid IT infrastructure makes perfect sense and allows companies to continue working in the cloud until the on-premise network is back online.

In fact, according to a SolarWinds survey, 92 per cent of U.S. IT professionals claim that cloud adoption is important to their organisation. In addition, it is application, database and storage requirements that that drive increasing adoption. When only 6 per cent of have not migrated anything to the cloud, can you afford to ignore the benefits?

However, bear in mind that cloud migration does not eliminate on-premise network concerns as, in the same report, 60 per cent of respondents believe it’s unlikely that everything will be cloud-based, with security and compliance of the greatest concern. Therefore, downtime remains a tangible risk and automated network monitoring can certainly help.

Prompt Response is Key

How will you know if your network goes down? During the working day, it may well be blatantly obvious, as users will immediately contact IT when they can no longer access services. But what happens when IT are offsite or it’s after working hours?

Power loss is admittedly rare in developed countries but loss of broadband or network access is more regular and companies need immediate alerts if this happens, given that key business activities, both internal and external rely on them.

One option is a hardware SMS gateway, which alerts the parties responsible for network monitoring, whether these are on-premise or outsourced from a local IT company. Most importantly, as each gateway contains a SIM Card, alerts are sent even when an internet connection is not present. With a 3G option to facilitate communication, automated email alerts (in addition to SMS) are also possible due to inbuilt modems and watchdog mechanisms.

With such an alert mechanism in place, response time is reduced and your chosen IT professionals can solve the root cause faster, reducing downtime and loss of productivity.

How Much does Downtime Cost?

In many situations, reactive support is necessary, hence the requirement for an automated alert system. With power loss and internet connection issues solved, companies can take additional steps to maintain business continuity.

The big one is, of course, data loss due to hardware failure. Hard drives fail regularly and few companies operate without protecting their data by using real-time backups and regular offsite archiving. However, this is only a small part of the network redundancy options available and each companies needs to evaluate their redundancy strategy. Ask yourself how much it will cost if your internal network goes down for an hour. How about an entire day?

In factory production, for example, an hour could be very costly. In a small office, perhaps not so much. Therefore, weigh the costs of employing network redundancy at all points in the data path against the cost and perceived risk of failure.

Increase Redundancy?

Reducing risk factors is a key objective in business but is generally considered in budgetary terms. If the risk is low and the cost for a redundant feature far exceeds the possible costs of failure then it is not worth implementing.

For example, redundant measures could include but are not limited to:

  • Network cabling setup that facilities redundancy — ring protocols or redundant coupling, for example.
  • Managed switches that reroute connections if one path fails.
  • Redundant dedicated broadband connections from another service provider.
  • Multiple backup plans for servers and desktops.
  • Use of colocation servers and failover technology.
  • Backups for cooling, power, fire and water detection

In conclusion, 100 per cent network redundancy comes with a hefty price tag, requiring ongoing maintenance and management from professionals with a variety of skill sets. Even then, 100 per cent uptime is not guaranteed.

Large enterprises with dedicated data centres can handle these requirements but smaller companies simply do not have the budget or staff to support a fully redundant network. While theoretically, it is indeed better to be proactive, it is more cost-effective to put a preventative maintenance process in place and react to hardware problems as they occur, in accordance with a defined disaster recovery plan. When alerts are automated, what more is needed to reduce downtime?

 

 

bio-photo

Michael O’Dwyer is a Hong Kong-based business and technology journalist, independent consultant and writer whose stories have appeared on Forbes.com, The Street, IBM’s Midsize Insider, HP’S Pulse of IT, Dell’s Tech Page One and other IT portals, typically covering areas where business and technology intersect. He writes for both US and UK audiences and acts as a technology and open source advocate in his personal and professional activities. Twitter: @MJODWYERHK

Monitoring Switches in Data Centers

MONITORING NETWORK SWITCHES IN DATA CENTERS

Network availability and performance are critical parameters in determining the proper operation of LAN, MAN or WAN. Malfunctions in network switches adversely affect the productivity of companies, therefore their proactive monitoring is an important element in the work of the administrator. Here we provide a short overview of methods used nowadays for monitoring of network switches.

SNMP Protocol

All types of switches can be monitored using SNMP. Monitoring can provide information within the port: port availability status and information about transmitted packets. In addition, we can monitor equipment performance metrics: CPU usage, RAM usage, etc.

NetFlow, sFlow, jFlow Protocols

NetFlow is a Cisco protocol running on the switches of the company, sFlow protocols and jFlow are similar technologies developed by competitors. These protocols provide information about a stream of data flowing through the network devices, providing detailed insight into the performance and network bandwidth. Because the data is pre-aggregated, the use of this protocol is easier than using a packet sniffer.

Packet sniffing : monitoring using the monitoring port 

The outer packet sniffer (usually built into NMS system) examines all network data packets sent through a special monitoring port in a switch. This port in a switch sends a copy of all network packets from different port (or ports) of a switch. Such packets are then analyzed by the NMS system. Out of the three switch monitoring technology, this one creates a highest load on CPU and network. 

NMS system 

The central point of the supervised switches environment is IT infrastructure and network monitoring system (NMS). The system aggregates data from the monitored points, provides powerful capabilities for analyzing and visualizing the information collected, and transmits alerts about incidents and failures.

SMS Alerts as an effective notification of failures 

A key element in the course of automatic detection of an incident or failure is early as possible and effective notification of the occurrence of the event. For this purpose, data center administrators often use SMS channel. Due to the very good responsiveness to SMS messages (incoming SMS is considered a high priority by the customer compared to other channels, type of e-mail, instant messaging) and versatility (SMS does not require any dedicated application) it is an often used channel for sending alerts about incidents or failures. In order to shorten the critical path (minimize number of devices between NMS server and GSM/3G network), one can use hardware SMS gateway with built-in GSM/3G modem. Such device allows to send SMS alert directly from NMS to the GSM network excluding external Internet Service Provider.